Handbook for Collège and Lycée pupils  new to ENP.

Parents as well as new pupils will find this Handbook useful. Your child's success in a new school (and what may be for you a new educational system) will partly depend on how much you know and understand.

We suggest that parents of younger pupils read through the relevant sections of what follows with them.

The English National Programme, the English-language part of this French International school, is referred to below as ‘the Programme’ or as ‘ENP’, the abbreviation which is often used to refer to it.

Help and advice are available from:

The Programme office, on the first floor of the main Lycée building (opposite room 116).

The ENP (teachers') staff room, room L34, in L block of the Collège on the first floor.

The ENP office can be contacted by email and telephone: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / 04 50 40 82 66.

The Head of Programme, Mr Woodburn, can be contacted via the ENP office email address.

Contents (click the link in the list below)

The International Lycée
The English National Programme
Why study in a French international school?
Joining the school and the Programme
Starting school: for pupils who do not speak French
Subjects studied and the time-table
Starting school: what to expect
Things to understand during your first days at school
'French special' and 'Maths special'
English National Lessons
Some things you need to know about the school year
Names you need to know

The International Lycée

The English National Programme (ENP) is not a separate school: it is an ‘international section’ which forms part of a large French school. This contains two parts: a Collège and a Lycée. The Collège International is a lower secondary school, taking pupils between the ages of 11 and 15 (from 6ème - the youngest class- to 3ème). The Lycée International is a senior school taking pupils between the ages of 15 and 19 (2nde - to 'terminale') There are four years in the Collège and three in the Lycée. 

Because this is a French school, almost all subjects are taught in French, by specialist teachers who teach in French. The exception to this is the subjects taught in ENP. There are three subjects taught by the English National Programme teachers. These are English, Mathematics and History-geography. You can find out more about these on this page below. There are other pages about these subjects on this website.  Students in the Programme take English and one (or two) of the other subjects. From the rentrée 2013, 6ème and 5ème pupils take England and History-geography and may also take ENP Mathematics. For more information on choosing these subjects, go to the ‘Choosing Options’ page on this site.

This French state school welcomes international students from all over the world, some of whom speak no French when they arrive. It also educates local pupils, and pupils who may not be French but who come from local primary schools, and who thus speak French well. The range of subjects taught, and the style of teaching and of examinations are exactly the same as in other French state schools.

The school is international in several ways: 

  • It welcomes children from many backgrounds and cultures.
  • It allows pupils who speak certain languages (such as English) to go on learning in that language throughout their secondary education. This is done inside the various National Programmes in the school. The English National Programme is the biggest: there are Programmes in German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, and Swedish as well. (In other international lycées in France, these Programmes are often referred to as 'Sections'). To find out more about the other international lycées in France like ours, please see the ‘Contact with other schools’ page.
  • The school offers special intensive teaching in French to international pupils who need to make progress in this language so that it can become their main language of instruction. It also offers special tuition in Mathematics for international pupils. These two special subjects are known as 'French special' ('Français spécial' or ‘Français langue étrangère'/ 'FLE') and 'Maths special' ('Mathématiques spéciales'). You can read about these two very important subjects below.
  • It is essential that you remember that the school is, first and foremost, a French school. Pupils must reach a high standard in French as quickly as possible, because most subjects are taught in French, and most examination papers must be answered in French.

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The English National Programme

For part of the school week (6 or 8 hours), the Programme teaches its pupils in English, just as in an English-speaking school. Courses in English National are based on the English curriculum (or on an adapted version of the French curriculum for History-geography), on a British style of teaching, and on British assessment practice (either taken directly from the UK or adapted to fit French practice) and exams.

The Programme has its own organisation, with a Head of Programme (Mr. Woodburn), and Heads of Department (responsible for subjects): Mrs Moriarty (English), Mr Grady (History-Geography), and Mrs Knowles (Mathematics). Its teachers are appointed and paid by the parents’ association,  ALA-ELP, which finances and governs the Programme.  Parents pay fees for the tuition received in the Programme.  All classrooms used by ENP for teaching are made available by the Franch school.

All pupils in the Programme study English and English literature for four hours each week when other pupils in the Lycée/ College (who are not in the Programme) are learning English as a foreign language.

The Programme's pupils also study a second subject in English for a further two hours each week. In 6ème and 5ème for the school year 2013-2014 the second subject is History-geography.  Mathematics in English may be added to this.

For pupils in classes above 5ème and below Terminale in 2013-2014, there is a choice between Mathematics and History-geography and both may be taken, depending on available places. Please see the ‘Options Choice’ page on this website to help you choose between these subjects. Options choices are first made on entry to the secondary section. The table on the ‘Options Choice’ page (available from the Home page) makes clear when you can choose and when choice is carried forward. Please note that you cannot take ENP Mathematics with classical langauges option (Latin or Greek and Latin) and that certain  combinations, between ENP options and those offered by the French school, will not be offered if there are very few pupils taking them.

It is important to remember that the Programme is part of the French school. Any pupil accepted into the Programme is still (first and foremost) a pupil in the International Lycée or Collège. The Programme’s lessons form part of the main timetable: there is no separate 'English' part of the week (unlike in the primary Programme, where all English teaching is grouped on Tuesday or Wednesday afternoons). Pupils in English National must obey the same school rules and follow the same procedures as all other pupils in the Collège / Lycée.

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Why study in a French international school?

The aim of the bilingual education offered by the Programme and the Lycée/Collège is to allow pupils to be able to speak, write and read two languages to a very high standard. In the end, you should be in the enviable position where neither is a ‘foreign’ language for you, because you will be used to employing both for thinking, learning and expressing yourself. The aim is also that you should take exams both in French and in English, (for example, GCSEs and the International Option of the French Baccalauréat and Brevet the OIB) so that you could go to university in French or English speaking countries - or perhaps in both.

But there are many advantages in this kind of truly bilingual education which go beyond exams and diplomas. To be able to understand the culture and way of looking at the world of fellow students and teachers who do not necessarily speak your mother tongue is a major advantage. This ability to understand things from two points of view in two languages is part of what we call bi-cultural education. Pupils are educated not just in two languages but within the educational cultures of two countries: France and Britain. This kind of education is not widely available in the world.

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Joining the school and the Programme

International pupils who are new to the school may know no French at all, or they may be fluent French speakers. Because of this, you may be asked to sit an entrance test in French.

If you come from a school which is part of the French educational system you will probably not be tested in French.  You will proceed to the next class in the normal way, unless your previous school has decided that you should repeat your last year. Most new pupils who have not come from a French school will sit a test in Mathematics. The results of French tests are used to place the new pupils within the four levels of 'French special' classes, from level 1 (beginners) to level 4 (advanced), and the results of the Mathematics test may be used to decide which class a new pupil will go into.  These tests are administered by the French school and are not connected with ENP Mathematics.

Pupils from local French primary schools who are already in the Programme are not, of course, tested for entrance in French and Mathematics: what counts here is their primary school’s ‘avis de passage en 6ème’.

All students, wherever they come from, are tested for entry into the English National Programme, which, as a ‘section international’ , tests pupils for entry into the College and the Lycée systematically.  

Entrance into any international section in the school depends upon a decision by the French inspector with responsibility for all such sections. All the Programme’s test results are sent via the school to him/her, and places are given only with his/her approval and agreement.

The ENP written tests last between one and two hours, depending on age-group. They include the writing of an essay, as well as comprehension exercises. A test of oral English is also taken.

Entrance tests take place in April or May and then again in late August for those who missed the earlier session. The test for students already in the Programme’s CM2 primary class take place in April or May within the Tuesday/ Wednesday afternoon teaching time. Tests for new pupils are organized and run by the French school: there is one session for the Collège and one for the Lycée. You should receive an official invitation ('convocation'), telling you when and where your tests will take place, unless you are already in a class in the Programme. The school communicates results. This may take some time, since marks have to be sent for the inspector’s ‘avis’. A list of pupils admitted to all international sections is published at the end of the school year. ‘Derogations de secteur’ are no longer needed by pupils applying to international sections.

Several decisions have to be made as test results are considered by the school. The most important one involves deciding if it is best for you to choose a form of schooling where you are educated in two languages and cultures. The school may have to decide which of the four levels of 'French special' you will go into, if you need help to learn or improve French. The school must also decide which year you will be placed in (this will be decided either by your age, or by your ability in Mathematics as shown in the Mathematics entrance tests – see above). We must decide, too, via the entrance test you take, whether your English is of a high enough standard for you to be admitted into the English National Programme. 

Finally, no matter how good your test result is, the school must decide simply if it has room for you. There may  be more pupils trying to obtain a place than places available for them. 

If you are accepted by the school, you will be told which class you will be in. A number designates the year or grade: 6ème (literally sixth year), for example, means British year 7, or American 6th grade. The letter which follows indicates one of several classes in that year. You might be told that you are going into '6ème C', for example. Class C in 6ème has its own timetable, its own set of teachers, and its own 'professeur principal'. This is a teacher who has special responsibility for the class, and all the pupils in it. This teacher will spend the first day or half-day of term in September with the class, explaining the new timetable, and other important matters. There will probably be a small group of ENP pupils in 6ème C: these are grouped with pupils from other 6eme classes to make up an ENP teaching group in each subject.

If you are tested and accepted before the beginning of the school year, you will start with other pupils on the first day of term. If you are tested at the beginning of the school year in August, you must wait for your results, and will probably be told to come to school for the first time later on, when lessons have already started. If you miss the start of school, you will normally be given your timetable and other information by one of the school's administrators. There is a list of the names of these at the end of this page.

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Starting school: for pupils who do not speak French

Remember that it will be very important for you to understand and speak French as soon as possible. This may sound very difficult, but you will be pleased to know that hundreds of pupils have joined the International Lycée/Collège speaking less than perfect French and have left perfectly bilingual in French and English some years later!

Try to make contact with (and make friends with, if you can) people who speak English and who can help you by explaining and translating. New students who speak no French are rarely placed alone in a class where nobody else speaks English.

English National Teachers and Mrs. Howen, the Programme Secretary, and her colleagues are available to help you and give advice during the first few days of your time with us and at other times. The Programme office is on the first floor of the main Lycée building (opposite room 116); the English National staff room is in L34, in L block of the College, on the first floor, near the office the ‘Principal Adjoint’ of the Collège.

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Subjects studied and the time-table

Since this handbook is mainly used by Collège pupils, this section deals with the Collège time-table. When coming into English National you need to:

·      Choose between English National Options (Mathematics and History-geography) - remembering that you cannot take ENP Mathematics with Latin or Latin/Greek.  In 6ème and 5ème in 2013-14 you will automatically take History-geography and may take ENP Mathematcs as well.

·     Choose whether to take German as your first foreign language (if you are coming into 6ème or 5ème, where German can be studied as a ‘true’ foreign language, as well as English National)

·     If you have taken only English National as your language subject in 6ème and 5ème, choose a second foreignin  language (LV2) from 4ème onwards (since from 4ème onwards two foreign languages are compulsory and English National counts as one of these).

·     Understand which hours in English National will add extra to your time-table and which will simply replace other subjects. ENP Language and Literature hours replace LV1 (first foreign language) hours; if you take German LV1, these hours will be extra. ENP History-geography hours (2 in English, plus two in French) replace ‘normal’ French History-geography and add a little to your time-table; ENP Mathematics hours are extra hours in the time-table.

This table shows subjects in Collège classes for last school year. The numbers show the hours of tuition received by pupils each week.

 

6ème

5ème

4ème

3ème

French

5

4.5

4.5

4.5

Maths

4

4

4

4

History/Geography & Civics

OIB History-Geography

3

 

2 + 2

3

 

2 + 2

3

 

2 + 2

3.5

 

2 + 2

1st Foreign Language

4

3.5

3.5

3.5

Physics

0

1.5

1.5

2

Biology

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.5

Technology

1.5

1.5

1.5

2

Art& Music

2

2

2

2

Sport

4

3

3

3

2nd Foreign Language

3.5


3.5


3.5

(NB depends on language)

3.5

(NB depends on language)

Latin (option)

 

2

3

3

Latin/ Greek (option)

 

 

4

4

Figures  are offered in good faith and as an indication only: please check with the Collège Interantional if in doubt

(The following comments on the table above repeat information given at other points on this page, but are grouped together here for convenience.)

  • English National students study four hours of English as first or second foreign language. 6ème and 5ème pupils in the Programme may take German as their first foreign language and English as their second; otherwise English is the only 'foreign' language studied until 4ème.
  • You will also take either ENP Mathematics and/or History-geography for two hours per week in ENP.  In 6ème  and 5ème for the school year 2013-14, History-geography is compulsory and ENP Mathematics optional.

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Starting school: what to expect

The dates for the start of the school years (and for all holidays) are available on the web-page of the Ministry of Education:

http://www.education.gouv.fr/pid184/le-calendrier-scolaire.html?annee=2&dept=

 

The Lycée/College website also give information on dates and times for the rentrée.  The address is:

http://www2.ac-lyon.fr/etab/lycees/lyc-01/international/

 


Teachers come back to school first (this is the ‘rentrée des professeurs’), then students are called into school, for one or two half days of induction before lessons start.


During this period, any time tabling problems are dealt with by the school and the Programme. Pupils spend their time with their ‘professeur principal’; induction activities are focused on communication of the time-table, distribution of books, administrative details such as bus and canteen passes, and, for those new to the school, a tour of the site. The time-table starts on a date defined by the ‘proviseur’ (head of the ‘Lycée/College’). 


During this period, the Programme communicates with all its pupils on the time-table, teaching groups and names of teachers, rooms and all such matters via the ENP ‘rentrée’ notice-board. This is just outside the Programme’s rooms in the College L building, first floor corridor near L31or L29 and is clearly labelled. If pupils have any difficulty in understanding this, they may ask for help from English National teachers. The ENP staff room is nearby on the same corridor: L34. Groups for ENP Lycée students are displayed outide the ENP office (first floor, Lycée building).

'French special' and 'Maths special' lessons are very important for some ENP pupils, but these will not start straight away at the beginning of September. Groups have to be made up (from the beginners' group, level 1, to the advanced group, level 4), and the timetables for these subjects have to be arranged. Lists of groups and lesson times will be displayed as soon as possible, or a French Special teacher will come to one of your lessons to give you these details.

Meanwhile, you will go to classes with the rest of your class. Your whole English National time-table will be reviewed and checked in English your first lesson in the Programme, whether this is English, Mathematics or History-geography. Be careful to note down subjects, times, rooms and names of teachers. There is a space in your ‘carnet de liaison’ (your personal school record book) for you to note down your time-table and these details carefully.

When 'French special' and 'Maths special' lessons start, you will be given a time-table which will give you several hours of these two subjects per week. These replace lessons on the 'normal' class timetable. They may also replace some English National lessons at first, because improving your French is an absolute priority.  When you do not have 'French special' or 'Maths special' subjects, you will go to lessons with the rest of your class.

 

If you do not speak French fluently, trying to understand is very difficult at first, but remember that your first target is to learn as much French as possible as quickly as possible. Listening and making an active effort to understand what is happening in lessons taught in French is very important.

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Things to understand or to do during your first days in school

  1. Your timetable. If you start school with the rest of the class, you will copy this down on the page provided in your ‘carnet de liaison’. If you are a new student in 6ème or 2nde you will be taken on a tour of the school on your first day, to help you find your way when lessons start.

  2. You will be given a booklet called the 'carnet de liaison'. You should have this document, which is often called simply the 'carnet', in your bag at all times and treat it like your official identity document and the school’s way of communicating with your family. Your family will also use it to communicate with the school.  You should fill in your name and other details in the front, and copy your timetable down on the special page provided. You are expected to treat this boook with care and always have it with you in school.  It contains a copy of the school rules, which you should read carefully.  If you are absent from school, there are special pages in the 'carnet' for your parents to sign and fill in, so that the school has a record of the cause of your absence.

  3. You will need to buy books and equipment. Lists of what you need to buy will be given out by your 'professeur principal' or by other teachers. Most items, including school bags (which should be large and strong) are available cheaply from all local supermarkets. Buy quickly: stocks disappear rapidly once school starts! You are expected to supply your own pens, files, paper, etc. in most subjects. Individual subject teachers will tell you about any special items you will need during your first lesson with them. You must buy a special homework diary, (known as a ‘cahier de textes’ or ‘agenda’): this will allow you to record homework accurately.
    Most textbooks are loaned to you by the Collège but have to be bought if you are in the Lycée. 'Bourses' (book-sales) are organised within the school, to enable you to buy second- hand text books. Collège pupils will visit the library as a class to collect their books early in the term and give them back at the end of the year. Lists of titles and publishers of Lycée textbooks are available before term starts at the ‘accueil’ next to the main car park.

  4. You must either eat at the school’s large canteen, or leave the school site to go home for lunch. If you choose to leave the site at lunchtime, you are called 'externe'. Pupils who are 'externe’ are expected to leave the site and go home. If you eat in school, you are called a 'demi-pensionnaire'. You must choose which of these two options you wish to choose and declare this officially to the school at the beginning of the school year. Pupils who eat in school pay for their meals by using a canteen card. Each meal you eat is recorded electronically using the card, and your family will be sent a bill. These cards are normally given out at the beginning of the school year by the 'professeur principal'. If you miss the beginning of the school year, you must go to the 'intendance' (the department which deals with money and meals, on the second floor of the main Lycée building), and ask for a card. If your French is not up to dealing with this, ask a French-speaker in your class to come with you.

  5. Understand the way the school day works. Lessons start at 7:55am and finish at 5:30pm. They are normally 55 minutes long.  Wednesday is a half-day in the Collège. Students have at least 55 minutes to eat at lunch time and there are morning and afternoon breaks of 15 minutes. You will not be taught during every period of the week. If you are in the Collège and have a free lesson during the day, you must go into the supervised study-rooms (known as 'études') or to the Collège library (known as the CDI), where you can do homework or other work. In ‘étude’ and in the CDI, you must sign the attendance register, to show that you are present. If you are free at the end of the day, you may simply be able to go home early, unless you rely on a school bus which leaves after 5:30pm. Your parents will be asked to fill in a form at the beginning of the year which will allow you to leave the school early if your lessons finish early.

  6. You must arrange your transport to and from school. Most of the 'Pays de Gex' (the French area between the Swiss border and the Jura mountains) is covered by free school bus-routes, because the Lycée (the upper school) serves the whole of this area. Check with your local 'mairie' (town/village hall) for routes and times. You will need a bus pass, which is supplied by the school once you have filled in the forms and comes via your ‘professeur principal’. If you have not got a pass, and need a form to ask for one, go to the office of the secretary of the College principal in L block. Of course, you do not have to take the school bus if your parents can take you to school. But if you think you will need to use the bus occasionally, it is best to get a bus-pass at the beginning of the year.

  7. Make sure you understand when lessons actually start. There is often a gap between the first half-day spent in school with your class and the start of lessons. If you are tested at the beginning of term, you will be told when to come in for lessons when you are sent your test results. Check the school website and this website for dates.

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'French special' and 'Maths special'

These lessons take place in small groups in separate classrooms. Inside your group you will find students of several ages and nationalities. The teachers will give you work to do in class and at home, and will expect you to learn quickly by working hard and carefully. They will speak to you and give you instructions in French, and you will have to do your best to understand and do what is expected. You will have to learn a little every day and revise regularly. Above all, you must participate in class. You will be in a small group so you should not feel embarrassed about starting to speak French in class.

If your marks are good and you make good progress, you will go up to the next group rapidly. Remember that the final aim of 'French special' is to make sure that you learn French as quickly as possible, by progressing rapidly through the four levels. But learning to speak and write a foreign language fluently is something which will take some time in 'French special'. If you are starting to learn French from zero, it may take quite a long time.

You may be wondering why 'Maths special' exists. Maths is the same subject, you might say, in every country, so that this subject could be seen as a means of communication for people who do not speak the same language.  In fact, the reasons for the existence of 'Maths special' are easy to understand. First of all, the language used in Mathematics is very specialised in English and in French, and you have to know this language in French before you can talk and write about Mathematics clearly. The other reason concerns the order in which mathematical topics are taught: this is different in each country. There will be things that you are expected to know in French Maths in 4ème, for example, that you may just not have been taught in your school or country of origin. There are also important differences in the way answers to problems must be set out and explained in French.

The goal of 'Maths special' is, again, to help you to get into normal Maths lessons taught in French as soon as you can.

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English National lessons

These start when other lessons start. The start of lessons is announced clearly on the Rentrée Notice Board (outside L31 in the College, L building, first floor) and via email to families. You will receive your English National hours as part of your main timetable from your ‘professeur principal’ and all your ENP lessons will be reviewed and checked with you in your first lesson in the Programme.  If you have questions or queries about this, come to the 'Rentrée Notice Board' and check.

If you take 'French special', you may find that some of these hours replace English National hours at first. This is because your French is probably not as good as your English, and must be your first priority. As you are moved to a higher group, your timetable will be likely to change. If you feel that 'French special' lessons are replacing  too many English National lessons, your parents should contact Mr. Woodburn (the Head of Programme) about this. Ask your parents to email the ENP office: (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) to ask to speak to him by telephone or meet him.

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Some things you need to know about the school year

  1. Marks and exams: there are no end-of-year in subjects taught in French. Instead, teachers give tests (known as 'contrôles') throughout the year. These marks and other marks are given as a number out of 20. A mark of 10/20 is often thought of as a pass-mark. High marks or 'encouragement marks' are not generally given. Marks in English National are also given out of 20 and may be higher than in other subjects, because they are based on a British system of marking. Criteria based on examination objectives and the National Curriculum are used and the resulting grades converted into French marks out of 20 in a way that is common to all teachers in an ENP subject.  There are annual examinations within the subjects taught in English National, as well as National examinations such as GCSEs and the International Option of the Baccalauréat.  Your subject teachers will tell you about these. Exam results are published each year with the ALA-ELP Association Newsletter and on this website. 

  2. Reports: marks are recorded on a report form and sent home at the end of each term. This report is known as a 'bulletin trimestriel'. The mark recorded in each subject is usually a mathematical average of all the marks given to you during the term. One very low mark or a zero may pull this average down. English National marks on the report are generated in a similar way, with reference to agreed assessment criteria which all of the teachers in each subject share. Marks are also now available to families on line. Families are given a password so that they can check marks and other details on-line. This service (known as Pronote) is very useful for parents and we encourage families to use it. If you are new to the school and speak little French, you may not be given marks in certain subjects (such as French) because these would be unfairly low. If you are in this position, the marks given by your 'French special' and 'maths special' teachers are very important.

  3. Conseils de classe before the three termly reports are sent home, all the teachers of each class meet with a school administrator to discuss the work and progress of each pupil in the class. This is called a 'conseil de classe'. Two parent and pupil representatives also attend this meeting. The teachers sum up the work and attitude of each student, and a general comment is added to each report. This meeting also looks forward to the end of the year, to see whether or not a pupil seems to be performing well enough to go up into the next class. The final 'conseil de classe' may recommend that the pupil should do the year again. This is known as a 'redoublement'. If the final 'conseil' recommends doing the year again, it should rarely come as a surprise, since warnings about work and progress will have been issued at the previous 'conseils'.

  4. Interim reports:  marks are also recorded and made available in Pronote at half term in the first and second terms, but not in the shorter summer term. These marks are to keep your parents informed of how you are doing in school. This report is called a 'relevé des notes'. There are no ‘conseils de classe’ before these interim marks are sent home, but there is consultation among teachers, so that pupils in difficulties are identified and so that action can be taken.

  5. Parents’ evenings: there are two types of meeting where your parents and pupils can meet teachers during the year. The first is a class meeting which takes place in September. Here, the teachers of a given class or of a whole level (6eme, 2nde, etc.) explain their way of working and what they expect of pupils during the year. The English National Programme holds meetings of this type separately in English: there is a meeting per level.

    The second round of meetings is just before or after Christmas. This is to give parents the chance to meet teachers individually and discuss progress. If parents speak little French these meetings can be demanding, but it is important that they come, if necessary with friends or colleagues who speak French and can translate. The school runs a booking service for these parents’ evenings. By booking, you sign up for a five minute slot with your child’s teachers.

  6. Holidaysare usually as follows:
    • Half term in late October/early November (often known as ‘Toussaint’): two weeks
    • Christmas holidays: two weeks
    • Half term in February/early March: two weeks
    • Spring holiday (not necessarily at Easter): two weeks
    • Some public bank holiday weekends: May/ June
    • Summer holidays: Late June/July (depending on the class you are in) until early September

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Names you need to know

Collège

The name of the principal adjoint (head of the College) is M. Raffier. His office is on the first floor of L building. Your parents should contact him if they have any serious problems or urgent questions.

There are two CPEs ('conseillers principaux d'education') in the Collège, each one working with two levels. You will be told where you can find your CPE when you start school.

Lycée

M. Brech is the Proviseur:  he is in charge of the whole school, both Collège and Lycée. His office is on the first floor of the administration section of the Lycée building.

M. Bommé is the new Proviseur Adjoint, or deputy head of the Lycée. He deals with matters such as curriculum and time-tabling. Her office is on the first floor of the Lycée building, near the Proviseur's office.

There are three CPEs ('conseillers principaux d'education') in the Lycée, one for each of three levels (2nde, 1ère and terminale).  You will be told where you can find your CPE when you start school.

Names of English National Programme staff

Mr. Woodburn is the Head of Programme. His office is in the English National Office, which is on the first floor of the Lycée, directly opposite room 116. He can be contacted via the ENP office address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

There are three Heads of secondary subject departments in ENP: Mrs. Moriarty (English); Mrs. Knowles (Mathematics) and Mr. Grady (History-Geography). They may each be contacted via email, the ENP office or the L34 staff-room (see below).

The Head of the Primary section is Mrs Woodburn: she is in charge of all aspects of the running of the primary section of the ENP.

You will find the Programme’s administrative staffin the English National Programme offices, on the first floor of the Lycée. In the same office as Mr. Woodburn, you will find Mrs. Howen, Mrs. Seller and Mrs. Chevrot. If you are in the Collège, the most direct way to find an English National teacher is to come to the English National staff room on the first floor of L block in the Collège, near the office of the ‘Principal Adjoint’:  this is room L34.

Remember, finding the right person to answer your question or solve your problem is an important part of finding your way around the school. Be patient and persistent and you will find someone to help you. We wish you good luck with your first days and weeks in school.

We ask parents to consult this website regularly and to read and respond to the regular email communication which will be sent from the Programme during the course of the school year. 

Email is the Programme's main means of communication with families throughout the school year.

We wish you an excellent and successful school year!

 

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Additional information